Beagle-Harrier dog

Beagle-Harrier-dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Beagle-Harrier is a scenthound. It is a breed of dog originating from France.

Characteristics

Appearance

The Beagle-Harrier appears to be either a large Beagle or a small Harrier. It is a medium-sized dog, between 45 and 50 centimeters (18 and 20 inches) tall at the withers, and it weighs between 19 and 21 kilograms (42 and 46 pounds). Its coat is usually tricolor, featuring the colors fawn, black, tan, or white. There are also grey-coated (tricolor) Beagle-Harriers. The Beagle-Harrier's body is usually muscular and its coat smooth and thick.

Temperament

The Beagle-Harrier is generally good with children and other pets. They are loyal, have lots of determination and are calm and relaxed when at home, making them a good family pet. They are a hunting breed and so require a lot of exercise and space.

Health

The Beagle Harrier is generally very healthy and has a life span of 12 to 13 years. Hip dysplasia could cause a big problem.

History

The Beagle-Harrier breed is old, with its origins unclear; they were initially bred to hunt rabbits and other small animals. They were popular in England since the early 14th century and were later imported into America in the mid-1800s to hunt rabbits.

Beagle-Harriers were bred in France in the 19th century by Baron Gerard.[citation needed] The Beagle Harrier could be a mixture of two breeds, the Beagle and the Harrier, or the midpoint in breeding between the two breeds. It was recognized by the FCI in 1974.


The Beagle-Harrier can now be quite rarely found in France and is even more rare in other countries.

Beagle dog

Beagle-dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Beagle is a breed of small hound that is similar in appearance to the much larger foxhound. The beagle is a scent hound, developed primarily for hunting hare. With a great sense of smell and superior tracking instinct, the beagle is employed as detection dog for prohibited agricultural imports and foodstuffs in quarantine around the world. The beagle is intelligent but single-minded. It is a popular pet due to its size, good temper, and lack of inherited health problems.

Although beagle-type dogs have existed for 2,500 years, the modern breed was developed in Great Britain around the 1830s from several breeds, including the Talbot Hound, the North Country Beagle, the Southern Hound, and possibly the Harrier.

Beagles have been depicted in popular culture since Elizabethan times in literature and paintings, and more recently in film, television, and comic books. Snoopy of the comic strip Peanuts has been called "the world's most famous beagle".

Appearance

The general appearance of the beagle resembles a miniature Foxhound, but the head is broader and the muzzle shorter, the expression completely different and the legs shorter in proportion to the body. They are generally between 13 and 16 inches (33 and 41 cm) high at the withers and weigh between 18 and 35 lb (8.2 and 15.9 kg), with females being slightly smaller than males on average.

They have a smooth, somewhat domed skull with a medium-length, square-cut muzzle and a black (or occasionally liver) gumdrop nose. The jaw is strong and the teeth scissor together with the upper teeth fitting perfectly over the lower teeth and both sets aligned square to the jaw. The eyes are large, hazel or brown, with a mild hound-like pleading look. The large ears are long, soft and low-set, turning towards the cheeks slightly and rounded at the tips. Beagles have a strong, medium-length neck (which is long enough for them to easily bend to the ground to pick up a scent), with little folding in the skin but some evidence of a dewlap; a broad chest narrowing to a tapered abdomen and waist and a long, slightly curved tail (known as the "stern") tipped with white. The white tip, known as the flag has been selectively bred for, as it allows the dog to be easily seen when its head is down following a scent. The tail does not curl over the back, but is held upright when the dog is active. The beagle has a muscular body and a medium-length, smooth, hard coat. The front legs are straight and carried under the body while the rear legs are muscular and well bent at the stifles.

The tricolored beagle—white with large black areas and light brown shading—is the most common. Tricolored beagles occur in a number of shades, from the "Classic Tri" with a jet black saddle (also known as "Blackback"), to the "Dark Tri" (where faint brown markings are intermingled with more prominent black markings), to the "Faded Tri" (where faint black markings are intermingled with more prominent brown markings). Some tricolored dogs have a broken pattern, sometimes referred to as pied. These dogs have mostly white coats with patches of black and brown hair. Tricolor beagles are almost always born black and white. The white areas are typically set by eight weeks, but the black areas may fade to brown as the puppy matures. (The brown may take between one and two years to fully develop.) Some beagles gradually change color during their lives, and may lose their black markings entirely.

Two-color varieties always have a white base color with areas of the second color. Tan and white is the most common two-color variety, but there is a wide range of other colors including lemon, a very light tan; red, a reddish, almost orange, brown; and liver, a darker brown, and black. Liver is not common and is not permitted in some standards; it tends to occur with yellow eyes. Ticked or mottled varieties may be either white or black with different colored flecks (ticking), such as the blue-mottled or bluetick beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the coloring of the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolor beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.

Sense of smell

Alongside the Bloodhound and Basset Hound, the beagle has one of the best developed senses of smell of any dog.In the 1950s, John Paul Scott and John Fuller began a 13-year study of canine behavior. As part of this research, they tested the scenting abilities of various breeds by putting a mouse in a one-acre field and timing how long it took the dogs to find it. The beagles found it in less than a minute, while Fox Terriers took 15 minutes and Scottish Terriers failed to find it at all. Beagles are better at ground-scenting (following a trail on the ground) than they are at air-scenting, and for this reason they have been excluded from most mountain rescue teams in favor of collies, which use sight in addition to air-scenting and are more biddable. The long ears and large lips of the beagle probably assist in trapping the scents close to the nose.

Temperament

The beagle has an even temper and gentle disposition. Described in several breed standards as "merry", they are amiable and typically neither aggressive nor timid, although this depends on the individual. They enjoy company, and although they may initially be standoffish with strangers, they are easily won over. They make poor guard dogs for this reason, although their tendency to bark or howl when confronted with the unfamiliar makes them good watch dogs. In a 1985 study conducted by Ben and Lynette Hart, the beagle was given the highest excitability rating, along with the Yorkshire Terrier, Cairn Terrier, Miniature Schnauzer, West Highland White Terrier, and Fox Terrier.

Beagles are intelligent but, as a result of being bred for the long chase, are single-minded and determined, which can make them hard to train. They can be difficult to recall once they have picked up a scent, and are easily distracted by smells around them. They do not generally feature in obedience trials; while they are alert, respond well to food-reward training, and are eager to please, they are easily bored or distracted. They are ranked 72nd in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, as Coren places them among the group with the lowest degree of working/obedience intelligence. Coren's scale, however, does not assess understanding, independence, or creativity.

Beagles are excellent with children and this is one of the reasons they have become popular family pets, but they are pack animals, and are prone to separation anxiety, a condition which causes them to destroy things when left unattended. Not all beagles will howl, but most will bark when confronted with strange situations, and some will bay (also referred to as "speaking", "giving tongue", or "opening") when they catch the scent of potential quarry. They also generally get along well with other dogs. They are not too demanding with regard to exercise; their inbred stamina means they do not easily tire when exercised, but they also do not need to be worked to exhaustion before they will rest. Regular exercise helps ward off the weight gain to which the breed is prone.

Health

The typical longevity of beagles is 12–15 years, which is a common lifespan for dogs of their size.

Beagles may be prone to epilepsy, but this can often be controlled with medication. Hypothyroidism and a number of types of dwarfism occur in beagles. Two conditions in particular are unique to the breed: "Funny Puppy", in which the puppy is slow to develop and eventually develops weak legs, a crooked back and although normally healthy, is prone to a range of illnesses; Hip dysplasia, common in Harriers and in some larger breeds, is rarely considered a problem in beagles. Beagles are considered a chondrodystrophic breed, meaning that they are prone to types of disk diseases.

In rare cases, beagles may develop immune mediated polygenic arthritis (where the immune system attacks the joints) even at a young age. The symptoms can sometimes be relieved by steroid treatments. Another rare disease in the breed is neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration. Affected puppies are slow, have lower co-ordination, fall more often and don't have a normal gait. It has an estimated carrier rate of 5% and affected rate of 0.1%. A genetic test is available.

Their long floppy ears can mean that the inner ear does not receive a substantial air flow or that moist air becomes trapped, and this can lead to ear infections. Beagles may also be affected by a range of eye problems; two common ophthalmic conditions in beagles are glaucoma and corneal dystrophy. "Cherry eye", a prolapse of the gland of the third eyelid, and distichiasis, a condition in which eyelashes grow into the eye causing irritation, sometimes exist; both these conditions can be corrected with surgery. They can suffer from several types of retinal atrophy. Failure of the nasolacrimal drainage system can cause dry eye or leakage of tears onto the face.

As field dogs they are prone to minor injuries such as cuts and sprains, and, if inactive, obesity is a common problem as they will eat whenever food is available and rely on their owners to regulate their weight. When working or running free they are also likely to pick up parasites such as fleas, ticks, harvest mites, and tapeworms, and irritants such as grass seeds can become trapped in their eyes, soft ears, or paws.


Beagles may exhibit a behaviour known as reverse sneezing, in which they sound as if they are choking or gasping for breath, but are actually drawing air in through the mouth and nose. The exact cause of this behaviour is not known, but it can be a common occurrence and is not harmful to the dog.

Bavarian Mountain Hound

Bavarian Mountain Hound-pets-dogs-dog breeds


The Bavarian Mountain Hound is a breed of dog from Germany. As a scent hound, it has been used in Germany since the early 20th century to trail wounded game. It is a cross between the Bavarian Hound and the Hanover Hound

Appearance

The Bavarian Mountain Hound's head is strong and elongated. The skull is relatively broad and slightly domed. It has a pronounced stop and a slightly curved nosebridge. The muzzle should be broad with solid jaws, and its lips fully covering the mouth. Its nose is black or dark red with wide nostrils. Its ears are high set and medium in length. They are broader at the base and rounded at the tips, hanging heavily against the head. Its body is slightly longer than it is tall and slightly raised at the rump. The neck medium in length, strong, with a slight dewlap. Topline sloping slightly upward from withers to hindquarters. Chest well-developed, long, moderately wide, and well let-down with a slight tuck-up. It has a long, fairly straight croup and solid back. While its tail is set on high, medium in length and hanging to the hock, carried level to the ground or hanging down.

Size

Bavarian Mountain Hounds weigh between 20 and 25 kg, males are 47 to 52 cm (18.5 to 20.5 in) high, while females are 44 to 48 cm (17.5 to 19 in).

Coat and color

The coat is short, thick and shiny, lying very flat against the body, and moderately harsh. It is finer on the head and ears, harsher and longer on the abdomen, legs, and tail. Its coat can come in all shades of black-masked fawn or brindle.

Temperament

Bavarian Mountain Hounds are calm, quiet, poised, and very attached to their masters and family. When hunting, they are hard, single-minded, and persistent, courageous, spirited, fast, and agile, they are at ease on a rugged terrain, with a superb nose and powerful hunting instinct. However, they need a patient, experienced trainer.

Care

The Bavarian Mountain is not suited for city life. It is in regular need of space and exercise and also requires regular brushing. They are not dogs for the casual hunter. Most are owned and used by foresters and game wardens.

Basset Hound

Basset Hound-pets-dogs-dog breeds

The Basset Hound is a short-legged breed of dog of the hound family. The Basset is a scent hound that was originally bred for the purpose of hunting hare. Their sense of smell and ability to ground-scent is second only to that of the Bloodhound. Basset Hounds are one of 6 recognised basset-type breeds in France. The name Basset is derived from the French word bas, meaning "low", with the attenuating suffix -et, together meaning "rather low". Basset Hounds are usually bicolours or tricolours of standard hound colouration.

Description

Appearance

Bassets are large, short, solid and long, with curved sabre tails held high over their long backs. An adult dog weighs between 20 and 35 kilograms (44 and 77 lb). This breed, relative to size, is heavier-boned than any other.

This breed, like its ancestor the Bloodhound, has a hanging skin structure, which causes the face to occasionally look sad; this, for many people, adds to the breed's charm. The dewlap, seen as the loose, elastic skin around the neck, and the trailing ears which along with the Bloodhound are the longest of any breed, help trap the scent of what they are tracking. Its neck is wider than its head. This, combined with the loose skin around its face and neck means that flat collars can easily be pulled off. The previous FCI standard described the characteristic skin of the Basset, which resembles its ancestor the Bloodhound as "loose". This wording has since been updated to "supple and elastic".The looseness of the skin results in the Basset's characteristic facial wrinkles. They drool a lot due to their loose flews.

The Basset's skull is characterised by its large dolichocephalic nose, which is second only to the Bloodhound in scenting ability and number of olfactory receptor cells.

The Basset's short legs are due to a form of dwarfism (see: Health). Their short stature can be deceiving; Bassets are surprisingly long and can reach things on table tops that other dogs of similar heights cannot. Because Bassets are so heavy and have such short legs, they are not able to hold themselves above water for very long when swimming, and should always be closely supervised in the water.

Coat

The short-haired coat of a Basset is long, smooth and soft, and sheds constantly. Any hound coloration is acceptable, but this varies from country to country. They are usually Black, Tan and White tricolors or Tan and White bicolors. Tan can vary from reddish-brown and Red to Lemon. Lemon and White is less common color. Any hound coloration is acceptable. Some Bassets are also classified as gray or blue - this colour is considered rare and undesirable.

The source of colour is the E Locus (MC1R), which has four alleles: EM, EG, E, and e. The EM, E and e alleles are present in the Basset Hounds. The E allele allows for the production of both red and black pigments, so is present with the majority of colour patterns in Basset Hounds.

Red and Lemon colours are caused by the e allele of MC1R. The e allele is recessive, so red and lemon dogs are homozygous e/e. Lemon dogs are lighter in colour than Reds, but the genetic mechanism that dilutes phaeomelanin in this instance is unknown. No black hairs will be present on either Red or Lemon dogs. If there are any black hairs, the dog is officially a tricolour.

The EM allele produces a black mask on the face that may extend up around the eyes and onto the ears. This pattern is most easily seen on Mahogany dogs, although any Basset colour pattern may express the EM allele, except for "red and white" or "lemon and white" due to e/e.

Many Bassets have a clearly defined white blaze and a white tip to their tail, intended to aid hunters in finding their dogs when tracking through underbrush.

Like all dogs, the Basset Hound's coat is naturally oily. The oil in their coat has a distinctive "hound scent", which is natural to the breed.

Temperament

The Basset Hound is a friendly, outgoing, and playful dog, tolerant of children and other pets. They are extremely vocal and famously devoted to tracking.

Health

Ears

Basset Hounds have large pendulous ears (known as "leathers") that do not allow air to circulate inside them, unlike other breeds with erect or more open ears. Their ears must be cleaned inside and out frequently to avoid infections and ear mites.

Short stature

According to the Basset Hound Club of America, the height of a Basset should not exceed 14 inches or 36 cm.

The Basset Hound's short stature is due to the genetic condition osteochondrodysplasia (meaning abnormal growth of both bone and cartilage). Dwarfism of this type in most animals is traditionally known as achondroplasia. Basset Hounds, Dachshunds and Bulldogs are a few of the dog breeds classified as Achondroplastic. This bone growth abnormality may be a predisposing factor in the development of elbow dysplasia seen in the breed, which leads to arthritis of the elbow joint.

Other health issues

In addition to ear problems, basset hounds may be susceptible to eye issues. Because of their droopy eyes the area under the eyeball can collect dirt and become clogged with a mucus.

Basset Hounds are prone to yeast infections in the folds around the mouth, where drool can collect without thoroughly drying out.

Overweight Basset Hounds develop many serious health issues, including bone and joint injuries, Gastric Dilatation Volvulus and paralysis.

The only recent mortality and morbidity surveys of Basset Hounds are from the UK: a 1999 longevity survey with a small sample size of 10 deceased dogs and a 2004 UK Kennel Club health survey with a larger sample size of 142 deceased dogs and 226 live dogs. See Mortality and Morbidity below.

Mortality

Median longevity of Basset Hounds is about 10.3 years in France and 11.3 years in the UK, which is a typical median longevity for purebred dogs and for breeds similar in size to Basset Hounds. The oldest of the 142 deceased dogs in the 2004 UK Kennel Club survey was 16.7 years. Leading causes of death in the 2004 UK Kennel Club survey were cancer (31%), old age (13%), gastric dilatation volvulus (11%), and cardiac (8%).

Morbidity

Among the 226 live Basset Hounds in the 2004 UKC survey, the most-common health issues noted by owners were dermatologic (such as dermatitis), reproductive, musculoskeletal (for example, arthritis and lameness), and gastrointestinal (for example, gastric dilatation volvulus and colitis). Basset Hounds are also prone to epilepsy, glaucoma, luxating patella, thrombopathia, Von Willebrand disease, hypothyroidism, hip dysplasia, and elbow dysplasia.

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen dog

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen-dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen  or PBGV, is a breed of dog of the scent hound type, bred to trail hares in bramble-filled terrain of the Vendée district of France.

Description

Appearance

Both, males and females should be of similar size, range between 12.5 and 15.5 inches (32 to 40 cm) at the withers and between 25 and 40 pounds (15 to 20 kilograms).

Like the other 3 Griffon Vendéen breeds: the Grand Griffon Vendéen, Briquet Griffon Vendéen, and the Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen; they are solid dogs that appear rough and unrefined yet casual. They have short legs, a sturdy bone structure, and a body that is only slightly longer than it is tall at the withers. The body length is not as extreme as that of a basset hound or dachshund.

The dogs have a tousled appearance, with a harsh double coat that is both long and rough.The hair on the face and legs may be softer than body hair. The fur on the face resembles a beard and moustache. They usually have very long eyelashes.

The skull is domed, with drop, oval ears like many hounds share, though dogs tend to have higher domes than bitches. The ears are set low and hanging, and if stretched out should reach the tip of the nose. The tail is usually held upright, and is long and tapered to the end, similar in shape to a saber.

The coloring is primarily white with spots of orange, lemon, black, grizzle (gray-and-white hairs), or sable, sometimes with tan accents. They may be bicolor, tricolor, or have grizzling.

Temperament and breeding

PBGVs are extroverted, friendly, and independent hounds. Sometimes called the "happy breed," PBGVs have tirelessly wagging tails and expressive, intelligent eyes. PBGVs are typically active and lively. While good with children, other dogs and pets, they may be unsuitable for very young children because of their energy and tendency to play bite. The PBGV standard states that the dog should "give voice freely"—as is typical of hounds, petits are outspoken dogs. If their 'pack' begins howling or singing, the dog will join in, with amusing results. PBGVs may howl alone or with a companion; they may howl to music, for fun, or in protest at being left alone. PBGV companions report that sleeping dogs have been known to awaken and howl along with favorite songs.

The PBGV is not a quiet dog. While no PBGV would ever be called "yippy," their assertive, hound-bray is uncharacteristically loud for their petite stature. The outspoken nature of a PBGV varies from dog to dog, but even the shyest Petit will greet other dogs with a bark or call.

Like other hounds, Petits are stubborn, and sometimes may not respond well to training.

Because they are so extroverted, friendly, and happy, PBGVs make excellent therapy dogs.

PBGVs are excellent hunting and tracking dogs. A "Hunting Instinct Test" with associated AKC certification is currently in development as a part of optional breed credentialing. Petits who work in this manner do not hunt to kill. In the Vendee region of France, the dogs are used to flush and track rabbit in the bramble, sending rabbit out into the open where the hunter takes the rabbit with a shot. Skilled hunting dogs work well with other dogs in the pack, alerting the pack to the presence of a rabbit, or to a rabbit in motion down a trail. "Saber tails," another PBGV nickname, are typically white at the tip of the tail, so the tail is easily identified by a hunter above the bramble and brush.

As a companion animal, this occasionally pronounced hunting instinct may manifest in the home as a dog that gives chase to birds, squirrel, and cats. For some PBGVs, this instinct may be difficult to overcome with training. Most PBGVs make fine companion animals, and have suitable manners to live among cats and other animals without assuming a hunting role. Potential PBGV owners are cautioned to be aware of this instinct and, if cats are present in the home, work to acclimate the puppy or dog to recognize that the cat is part of the home "pack."

As scent hounds, most PBGVs should be kept on-leash when in open outdoor areas. Even the most obedient dog may give chase when a scent is found. Petits are natural athletes, and they can run fast and long where scent is involved. Scent will typically trump obedience in the mind of a PBGV.

The outspoken nature and erect tail of a PBGV can be misinterpreted by other dogs, as these manners typically express dominance to other dogs. PBGVs can inspire a misguided need to express dominance on the part of passing dogs. PBGV owners need to be alert to this potential misinterpretation, as Petits are easily outclassed in both size and aggressiveness.

Health

The UK Kennel Club conducted a health survey of Basset Griffon Vendéens (both Petit and Grand varieties combined) in 2004. The Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen (PBGV) Club of America has conducted two health surveys, one in 1994 and one in 2000. The club is currently conducting another survey. These are apparently the only completed or on-going health surveys for Basset Griffon Vendéens  (as of July 2007).

Mortality
Average longevity of PBGVs in the 2000 Club of America survey was 12.7 years (standard deviation 3.9). Sample size was not clear, but it appeared to be 45 dogs. No longevity data were collected in the 1994 survey. There was no information on causes of death.

Average longevity of 76 deceased Basset Griffon Vendéens (both varieties) in the 2004 UK Kennel Club survey was 12.1 years (maximum 17.3 years). Leading causes of death were cancer (33%), old age (24%), and cardiac (7%).

Compared to surveyed longevities of other breeds of similar size, Basset Griffon Vendéens have a typical or somewhat higher than average life expectancy.

Morbidity

In the PBGV Club of America 2000 survey, the most common diseases reported by owners of 640 dogs were persistent pupillary membranes, recurrent ear infections, hypothyroidism, neck pain, and epilepsy.

Among 289 live Basset Griffon Vendéens (both varieties) in the 2004 UKC survey, the most common health issues noted by owners were reproductive, dermatologic (dermatitis and mites), and aural (otitis externa, excessive ear wax, and ear mites).

Care

They should have daily walks to burn off excess energy. They need to be brushed regularly, but not daily, to avoid matting and tangles. To keep the coat well groomed it must be stripped. Hairs must be pulled out of the coat using either a special stripping tool or the finger and thumb. The coat is shallow rooted and is made to come out if trapped, so this grooming method causes no pain. They need regular ear cleanings to prevent yeast infections and clipping of the claws is normally needed once or twice a month.

Part of the charm of a PBGV is its tousled, unkempt appearance.

Crufts 2013

Winner of the world's biggest dog show, Crufts, in 2013, the four-year-old Soletrader Peek A Boo ("Jilly") beat more than twenty thousand dogs to take the coveted title. She won the Hound Group on the first day of the show and then proceeded to win Best of Show on the fourth day. Jilly was previously Reserve Best of Show at Crufts in 2011.

Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen dog

Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen-dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen or GBGV is a dog breed from France.

History

The Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen is derived, like all bassets, from hounds of superior size, in this case the Grand Griffon. The first selections were made at the end of the 19th century by the Comte d'Elva who was looking for subjects with "straight legs". But it was Paul Dézamy who was especially responsible for fixing the type. He had understood that in order to catch a hare, dogs of a certain size were needed. He fixed the size at about 43 cm. Today used primarily when hunting with a gun, it is capable of hunting all furry game, from the rabbit to the wild boar. A team of Grand Bassets won the 5th edition of the European Cup for hare.

Appearance

Basset

Grand Basset Griffon Vendéens a long-backed, short-legged hunting breed of dog of the hound type, originating in the Vendée region of France. They are still used today to hunt boar, deer, and to track rabbit and hare, but are more commonly kept as a domestic pet.

They are pack dogs, so owners should either spend a lot of time with them or get a second dog or a cat. They have a happy and confident personality, which can sometimes manifest itself as disobedience, but they are great companions.

Health

The UK Kennel Club conducted a health survey of Basset Griffon Vendéens (Petit and Grand varieties combined) in 2004. This is apparently the only completed health survey (as of July 16, 2007) that might include Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen, but it is unclear what proportion of dogs in the survey were Grand Basset Griffon Vendéens instead of the more common Petit.

Longevity

Average longevity of 76 deceased Basset Griffon Vendéens (varieties combined) in the 2004 UK Kennel Club survey was 12.1 years (maximum 17.3 years). Leading causes of death were cancer (33%), old age (24%), and cardiac (7%).

Compared to surveyed longevities of other breeds of similar size, Basset Griffon Vendéens have a typical or somewhat higher than average life expectancy.

Among 289 live Basset Griffon Vendéens (varieties combined) in the 2004 UKC survey, the most common health issues noted by owners were reproductive, dermatologic (dermatitis and mites), and aural (otitis externa, excessive ear wax, and ear mites).

Basset Fauve de Bretagne dog

Basset Fauve de Bretagne-dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Basset Fauve de Bretagne is a short-legged hunting breed of dog of the scent hound type, originally from Brittany, a historical kingdom of France.

Appearance

The Basset Fauve de Bretagne is a smallish hound, built along the same lines as the Basset Hound, but lighter all through and longer in the leg. Wire-coated, the coat is very harsh to the touch, dense, red-wheaten or fawn. He measures 32 – 38 cm in height and weighs between 36 - 40 lbs but due to the old, and no longer permitted, practice of registering mixed litters of Griffon and Basset Fauves sometimes a litter of bassets will produce a long legged dog more akin to the Griffon. They have coarse, dense fur which may require stripping. The hair on the ears is shorter, finer and darker than that on the coat. The ears just reach the end of the nose rather than trailing on the ground and should be pleated. They should have dark eyes and nose and ideally no crook on the front legs. The French standard says these are the shortest backed of all the basset breeds so they generally do not appear as exaggerated as the British Basset.

Health

There is apparently only one completed health survey of Basset Fauve de Bretagnes,[1] a 2004 UK Kennel Club survey with a small sample size. The French Basset Fauve de Bretagne kennel club, Club du Fauve de Bretagne (http://fauvedebretagne.free.fr/ - in French), is currently (as of July 15, 2007) conducting a health survey, but the questionnaire asks owners about all of their dogs collectively (rather than each individual dog) and does not ask about longevity. The UK Club is planning a new, in depth health survey to be run late 2012 early 2013 in the hope that the longevity can be more accurately represented.

Mortality

Based on a small sample size of 15 deceased dogs, Basset Fauve de Bretagnes in the 2004 UK Kennel Club survey had a median longevity of 10.4 years (maximum 13.9 years), which is a typical median longevity for purebred dogs, but a little low compared to other breeds of similar size. Most common causes of death were road traffic accidents, cancer, heart failure, and kidney failure. The high incidence of road traffic accidents may be perhaps blamed on this dog's love of the scent. Many pet Fauves go AWOL when they find a scent and this character trait is something an owner must never forget. Fauves can be trained very well in a controlled environment but training is rapidly forgotten once a fresh rabbit trail is found.

Morbidity

Among 84 live dogs in the 2004 UKC survey, the most common health issues noted by owners were reproductive, aural (otitis media and otitis externa), and ocular (corneal ulcers and cataracts).

Breed description


The Basset Fauve de Bretagne is a neat looking hound, free from exaggeration and lively and friendly; as a scenthound, though, he has the usual failing of becoming absorbed with what he's scenting. He is agile enough to trouble any rabbit he scents. Where the Basset Fauve de Bretagne is still used for hunting it is either singly or in pairs. The Basset Fauve de Bretagne became established as a distinct breed early in the 19thC and were introduced to the UK in 1983, and their cheerful disposition has earned them a good many friends. Overall a very sound dog they do not appear to suffer from any particular hereditary defects. However, like all hounds they are of an independent turn of mind, and early training in puppyhood will reap dividends later. It is never realistic to expect a hound to be obedient, as they have their own agenda much of the time, but they should become fairly co-operative. The coat is easy to care for; a regular brush will keep it smart, but, like a terrier he will need stripping two or three times a year. This is not a difficult task though you may prefer to leave it to a grooming parlour. A cheerful and equable breed, the Basset Fauve de Bretagne is of a size to make a handy housedog, though he has a great taste for exercise and thoroughly enjoys getting out into the fields. Most Basset Fauve de Bretagne's can be understood because their eyes are very clear and their ears turn out when they are nervous or unsure.

Basset Bleu de Gascogne dog

Basset Bleu de Gascogne -dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Basset Bleu de Gascogne ,also known as the Blue Gascony Basset, is a long-backed, short legged breed of dog of the hound type. The breed originated in the Middle Ages, descended from the Grand Bleu de Gascogne. It nearly became extinct around the early 19th century; its salvation was attributed to one Alain Bourbon. A French native breed, it is rare outside its homeland. It is recognized internationally by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, in the UK by The Kennel Club, and by the United Kennel Club in the United States. The "bleu" of its name is a reference to its coat which has a ticked appearance.

Appearance

The color of their coat is predominantly white, ticked so as to give a bluish appearance, with brown spots and tan markings above the eyes and on the ears. They are a smooth-coated breed. Height at the withers is usually between 34 and 42 centimetres (13 and 17 in) although the Kennel Club standard specifies 30–38 centimetres (12–15 in). Their general appearance is usually not too heavy, and they weigh between 16 and 18 kilograms (35 and 40 lb). They have dark brown eyes and low-set ears that can reach at least the end of their muzzle. Because of their working nature as a hunting hound, effects of this work such as scars, nicks, notches on the ears and so on are not considered a fault in the show ring.

Recognition and categorisation


The Kennel Club of the UK recognizes the Basset Bleu De Gascogne in the imported breed register and in the Hound Group. The United Kennel Club recognised the breed in 1991, and both they and the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) list the Basset Bleu De Gascogne in the Scenthound Group. The breed is also known as the Blue Gascony Basset in the FCI. The Basset Bleu De Gascogne is not recognized by the American Kennel Club or the Canadian Kennel Club. In addition to the major registries, the Basset Bleu De Gascogne is also recognized by many minor registries and specialty registries, including as a rare breed under the American Rare Breed Association which uses the FCI standard.

Basset Artesien Normand dog

Basset Artésien Normand-dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Basset Artésien Normand  is a short legged hound type dog developed in France. The word basset refers to short-legged hounds

Appearance

The height of the Basset Artésien Normand is between 30 and 36 cm (11.8 to 14.2 in), with a ratio of the height to the body length of about 5 : 8. Weight is roughly 17 kg (37.4 lbs). The coat is short and tricolored (fawn and white with black blanket, a patch across the back) or bicolored (fawn and white). The head and long ears are distinctive, and the temperament should be calm and good-natured.

Recognition

The original breed club is the Club français du Basset Artésien Normand & du Chien d'Artois, and the breed is recognised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale as breed number 34 in Group 6, Scenthounds. It is also recognised by the United Kennel Club (US) in the Scenthound Group. The breed may also be recognised by any of the various minor kennel clubs and internet based dog registry businesses, as well as hunting dog registries and clubs. As the breed is few in number outside France it is also promoted by rare breed breeder organisations for puppy buyers seeking an unusual pet.

Basque Shepherd Dog

Basque Shepherd Dog-pets-dog breeds

The Basque Shepherd Dog is a landrace breed of dog originating in the Basque Country and traditionally used by the local shepherds to help them take care of their cattle and sheep. Perro de pastor vasco (pastor vasco for short) is the Spanish name, and euskal artzain txakurra is the Basque, by which they are known in their homeland. It is believed that they originated from Central European herding dogs.

Appearance

These dogs are well proportioned, with strong, rectangular bodies and trotter features. Their eyes are oval and are brown or amber. Their ears are medium-sized, triangular and sometimes show folds. The vivid yellow medium length rough coat is longer over the trunk than over the head and is shorter on the face, but does not hide the eyes. The relation between height and length is about 1/1.2. The head is rather light relative to the trunk, which is attached by a short neck and muscular.

Smooth-haired Gorbeiakoa

Of the two distinct types of Basque Shepherd Dog, the more outgoing Gorbeiakoa is the more pure and ancient of the two. It is recognized by the moderate length hair coat, which texture is smooth and soft. It is very short and smooth on the face and on the front of the legs. There is a plume on the back of the legs. The coat color can be either fire-red or fawn, and it has a dark mask on the muzzle. The height of males is 47 to 61 cm and of females 46 to 59 cm. Males weight 18 to 36 kg and females 17 to 29 kg.

Rough-haired Iletsua

The Iletsua variety has a rough, coarse and bristle, moderate length hair. It is shorter on the front of the legs. The coat color is either cinnamon or fawn. The height of males is 47 to 63 cm and of females 46 to 58 cm. Males weight 18 to 33 kg and females 17 to 30 kg.

Activities

The Basque Shepherd Dog can compete in dog agility trials, obedience, Rally obedience, Schutzhund, showmanship, flyball, tracking, and herding events. Herding instincts and trainability can be measured at noncompetitive herding tests. Basque Shepherd Dogs that exhibit basic herding instincts can be trained to compete in herding trials.

Basque Sheepdogs in America

Some Basque herders brought their sheepdogs to the Western United States when they journeyed to the United States in the 1950s under sheep herding contracts with the Western Range Association in an agreement with the Spanish government.


Basenji dog

Basenji-dogs-pets-dog breeds

The Basenji is a breed of hunting dog. It was bred from stock that originated in central Africa. Most of the major kennel clubs in the English-speaking world place the breed in the Hound Group—more specifically, in the sighthound type. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale places the breed in group five, spitz and primitive types, and the United Kennel Club (US) places the breed in the Sighthound & Pariah Group.

The Basenji produces an unusual yodel-like sound commonly called a "baroo", due to its unusually shaped larynx. This trait also gives the Basenji the nickname "soundless dog"

Basenjis share many unique traits with pariah dog types. Basenjis, like dingoes, New Guinea singing dogs and some other breeds of dog, come into estrus only once annually—as compared to other dog breeds, which may have two or more breeding seasons every year. Both dingoes and Basenji lack a distinctive odor, and are prone to howls, yodels, and other vocalizations over the characteristic bark of modern dog breeds. One theory holds that the latter trait is the result of selecting against dogs that frequently bark—in the traditional Central African context—because barking could lead enemies to humans' forest encampments. While dogs that resemble the Basenji in some respects are commonplace over much of Africa, the breed's original foundation stock came from the old growth forest regions of the Congo Basin, where its structure and type were fixed by adaptation to its habitat, as well as use (primarily net hunting in extremely dense old-growth forest vegetation).

The name comes from the Lingala language of the Congo, mbwá na basɛ́nzi which means "village dogs".

Lineage

The Basenji is an ancient breed. It has been identified as a basal breed that predates the emergence of the modern breeds in the 19th century. Recent DNA studies based on whole-genome sequences indicate that the domestic dog is a genetically divergent subspecies of the gray wolf and was derived from a now-extinct ghost population of Late Pleistocene wolves, and the basenji and the dingo are both considered to be basal members of the domestic dog clade. "The term basal refers to a lineage that diverges early in the history of the group...and lies on a branch that originates near the common ancestor of the group."

Name

The Azande and Mangbetu people from the northeastern Congo region describe Basenjis, in the local Lingala language, as mbwá na basɛ́nzi. Translated, this means "dogs of the savages", or "dogs of the villagers". In the Congo, the Basenji is also known as "dog of the bush." The dogs are also known to the Azande of southern Sudan as Ango Angari. The word basɛ́nzi itself is the plural form of mosɛ́nzi. In Swahili, another Bantu language, from East Africa, mbwa shenzi translates to “wild dog”. Another local name is m’bwa m’kube m’bwa wamwitu, or “jumping up and down dog” a reference to their tendency to jump straight up to spot their quarry.

Characteristics

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Appearance

Basenjis are small, short-haired dogs with erect ears, tightly curled tails and graceful necks. A Basenji's forehead is wrinkled, even more so when they are young or extremely excited. A Basenji's eyes are typically almond-shaped. Basenjis typically weigh about 9.1–10.9 kg (20–24 lb) and stand 41–46 cm (16–18 in) at the shoulder. They are a square breed, which means they are as long as they are tall with males usually larger than females. Basenjis are athletic dogs, and deceptively powerful for their size. They have a graceful, confident gait like a trotting horse, and skim the ground in a double suspension gallop, with their characteristic curled tail straightened out for greater balance when running at their top speed. Basenjis come in a few different colorations: red, black, tricolor, and brindle, and they all have white feet, chests and tail tips. They can also come in trindle, which is a tricolor with brindle points, a rare combination.

Temperament

The Basenji is alert, energetic, curious and reserved with strangers. The Basenji tends to become emotionally attached to a single human. Basenjis may not get along with non-canine pets. Basenjis dislike wet weather, like to climb, and can easily get over chain wire fences.

Basenjis often stand on their hind legs, somewhat like a meerkat, by themselves or leaning on something; this behavior is often observed when the dog is curious about something. Basenjis have a strong prey drive. According to the book The Intelligence of Dogs, they are the second least trainable dog.

Health

There is apparently only one completed health survey of Basenjis, a 2004 UK Kennel Club survey.

Basenjis are prone to blindness from progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and Fanconi syndrome. They can also suffer from hypothyroidism, immunoproliferative systemic intestinal disease (IPSID), and hemolytic anemia (HA). Basenjis are also sensitive to environmental and household chemicals, which may cause liver problems.

Longevity

Basenjis in the 2004 UK Kennel Club survey had a median lifespan of 13.6 years (sample size of 46 deceased dogs), which is 1–2 years longer than the median lifespan of other breeds of similar size. The oldest dog in the survey was 17.5 years. Most common causes of death were old age (30%), urologic (incontinence, Fanconi syndrome, chronic kidney failure 13%), behavior ("unspecified" and aggression 9%), and cancer. (9%).

Among 78 live dogs in the 2004 UKC survey, the most common health issues noted by owners were dermatologic and urologic (urologic issues in Basenjis can be signs of Fanconi syndrome).

Fanconi syndrome

Fanconi syndrome, an inheritable disorder in which the renal (kidney) tubes fail to reabsorb electrolytes and nutrients, is unusually common in Basenjis. Symptoms include excessive drinking, excessive urination, and glucose in the urine, which may lead to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. Fanconi syndrome usually presents between 4 and 8 years of age, but sometimes as early as 3 years or as late as 10 years. Fanconi syndrome is treatable and organ damage is reduced if treatment begins early. Basenji owners are advised to test their dog's urine for glucose once a month beginning at the age of 3 years. Glucose testing strips designed for human diabetics are inexpensive and available at most pharmacies. Steve Gonto, M.M.Sc., Ph.D., has a 'Fanconi Disease Management Protocol for Veterinarians' that is commonly used by many veterinarians with Fanconi syndrome afflicted dogs. The current DNA test for Fanconi syndrome may be ordered from offa.org.

Fanconi DNA linkage test

In July 2007, Dr. Gary Johnson of the University of Missouri released the linked marker DNA test for Fanconi syndrome in Basenjis. It is the first predictive test available for Fanconi syndrome. With this test, it is possible to more accurately determine the probability of a dog's carrying the gene for Fanconi syndrome.

Dogs tested using this "linkage test" return one of the following statuses:

·         Probably clear/Normal
Indicates the individual has most likely inherited normal DNA from both parents. It is unlikely that Basenjis that test this way will produce affected puppies, no matter which dog they breed with.
·         Probably carrier
Indicates the individual has most likely inherited normal DNA from one parent and DNA with the Fanconi syndrome mutation from the other parent.This basenji is unlikely to develop Fanconi syndrome, but could produce puppies that do. To minimize the chances of this happening, it is recommended carriers be bred only to those that test as Probably clear/Normal for Fanconi syndrome.
·         Probably equivocal/Indeterminate
Indicates the individual's DNA contained features found in both "normal" and "carrier" Basenjis. At present it cannot be predicted whether these Basenjis are carriers or normal; however, it is unlikely that they will develop Fanconi syndrome. The safest strategy would be to treat them as “carriers” and bred to only those Basenjis that test as Probably Clear/Normal for Fanconi syndrome.
·         Probably affected
Indicates the individual is likely to develop clinical Fanconi syndrome and is likely to produce puppies with Fanconi syndrome if bred to Basenjis other than those that test as Probably Clear/Normal for Fanconi syndrome.
This linkage test is being provided as a tool to assist breeders whilst research continues towards the development of the direct Fanconi test.
The direct Fanconi DNA test has now been developed and may be ordered from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals at http://www.offa.org/dnatesting/fanconi.html .

For more information about the linkage test, visit: Basenji Health Endowment Fanconi Test FAQ.

Other Basenji health issues

Basenjis sometimes carry a simple recessive gene that, when homozygous for the defect, causes genetic hemolytic anemia. Most 21st-century Basenjis are descended from ancestors that have tested clean. When lineage from a fully tested line (set of ancestors) cannot be completely verified, the dog should be tested before breeding. As this is a non-invasive DNA test, a Basenji can be tested for HA at any time.

Basenjis sometimes suffer from hip dysplasia, resulting in loss of mobility and arthritis-like symptoms. All dogs should be tested by either OFA or PennHIP prior to breeding.

Malabsorption, or immunoproliferative enteropathy, is an autoimmune intestinal disease that leads to anorexia, chronic diarrhea, and even death. A special diet can improve the quality of life for afflicted dogs.

The breed can also fall victim to progressive retinal atrophy (a degeneration of the retina causing blindness) and several less serious hereditary eye problems such as coloboma (a hole in the eye structure), and persistent pupillary membrane (tiny threads across the pupil).




Barbet dog

Barbet dog-pets-dogs-dog breeds

The barbet is a breed of dog; it is a medium-sized French water dog. It is listed in Group 8 (retrievers, flushing dogs, water dogs) by the Société Centrale Canine, the French Kennel Club.The breed name "barbet" comes from the French word barbe, which means beard.

Description

The barbet is a rare breed. Most barbets, especially those shown in conformation shows, are entirely black, black and white, or brown. It is common to see white chest spots and white paws or legs on black or brown coated dogs. Parti, creme, and pied variations are being born but in very limited numbers.

Male barbets usually grow to be about 21 to 25 in (53 to 64 cm) tall and between 40 and 60 lb (18 and 27 kg), while females usually reach about 20 to 23 in (51 to 58 cm) and 30 to 50 lb (14 to 23 kg).

Appearance

The breed stands 58–65 cm (23–26 in) for the males, 48.26–61 cm (19.00–24.02 in) for females with a tolerance of 1 cm +/- 1 cm (0.39 in), and weighs 17–28 kg (37–62 lb). The barbet is a prototypic water dog, with a long, woolly, and curly coat.

Their coats grow long and must be groomed regularly, otherwise the coat can become matted and the barbet may lose small tufts of hair like tumbleweeds.

The accepted colours of the breed are solid black, brown, fawn, grey, pale fawn, white, or more or less pied. All shades of red-fawn and pale fawn are permitted. The shade should, preferably, be the same as the colour of the body. Grey and white are extremely rare; mixed colours (except with white) are considered a fault. The most common colors are black or brown with white markings. The birth figures worldwide for 2007 are 176. All born were black or brown some with white markings on the chest, chin, and legs.

Temperament

The barbet’s personality is described as friendly, joyful, obedient, and intelligent. They are quick to learn and need lifelong obedience training. They are a great with children, families, and the elderly. Barbets will bond with their family and prefer to be in the same room with the family at all times. They need exercise daily to keep the dog in a healthy state of mind and body.

They are capable retrievers for waterfowl hunting. In France, the barbet can take the Test d'Aptitudes Naturelles (T.A.N.), a basic water retrieving test, and has recently been permitted to participate in the BCE (Brevet de Chasse a l'Eau), a general hunting test involving field and water trials. In Germany, the barbet takes part in field trials.

Genetic diseases

Barbets are vulnerable to certain genetic defects. Due to the limited gene pool for this breed, conscientious breeders carefully study pedigrees and select dogs to minimize the chance of genetic diseases. Unfortunately, like many breeds, a growing popularity has encouraged breeding by people who are not knowledgeable about the breed. Of the few health issues that have exhibited themselves; epilepsy, hernias, hip dysplasia and entropion, most problems can be traced back 4-6 generations. Often this was due to limited breeding stock as well as the fact that many matings were with dogs of unknown medical history.

Overall Health

Due to the extremely low number of barbets in the world, little is known about long term health issues. Some issues that have exhibited themselves are ear infections, hip dysplasia, hernias, undescended testicles, undershot/overshot bites, and epilepsy. However, a study has just begun in France about health issues in the barbet as several breeds have recently "contributed" to the Barbet. Most breeders today hipscore the parents before any matings and A, B, and C hipscores can be used.

The most common of these issues are ear infections, a problem in most water dog varieties. Ear problems can be minimized by proper ear care. A veterinarian should be consulted if the dog shows signs of an ear infection. The ear should always be clear of any hair, and inspected very regularly.

Hip dysplasia

Like poodles, barbets are vulnerable to hip dysplasia. However, the risk of a barbet developing hip dysplasia can be greatly reduced by thoroughly checking the pedigrees and health clearances in both the sire and dam of your dog.

Lifespan

Lifespan of the barbet averages 13–15 years with one recorded living until 19 years of age.

Status in the United States

There are very few barbets in the United States. Estimated barbet numbers living in America as of 2013 are somewhere between 150-200. Steps are being taken to slowly and responsibly increase the barbet population in the States, through careful breeding and imports from Canada and Europe.

Currently, barbets may be fully registered in the United States with ARBA or the UKC, and there has been a recent acceptance in the AKC Foundation Stock Service Program. According to the AKC, to get full recognition there needs to be at least 150 Barbets registered with the AKC's Foundation Stock Service to apply for full recognition.

Additionally, there needs to be an active Barbet Club promoting the breed through meet the breeds, fun matches, rally, obedience, hunting, and showing active membership as well as interest in the breed. It is crucial every barbet imported or born in America be registered with the AKC FSS for the breed to survive in America. In 2009, there was one litter of 6. In 2011 there were two barbet litters: 5 brown puppies born in April, and 11 puppies (5 brown, 6 black) born on Thanksgiving. In 2012 there were two litters born in America. In 2013 there were 3 litters born in the States.

Status in Great Britain (UK)

In modern times, the first barbet, a male, was brought into the UK in 2001 although he did not reproduce. In 2007 two unrelated females were brought in from France, having completed their period of quarantine and the majority of barbets currently in the UK are descendants of these. Since then, further examples of the breed have been imported from France, Holland, Canada and Poland. Several UK-born barbets have been used in the breeding programmes of other countries and their offspring can be found in Holland, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, Finland and Canada.

As of 2014, the barbet is not a breed recognized by The Kennel Club, so barbets born in the UK are registered in France (the country of origin) by the Société Centrale Canine which is a full F.C.I. member. There are on average only one or two litters born per year in the UK. As of 2015 there are approximately 70 barbets living in the UK.


The majority of barbets in the UK are kept as pets, although a small number are used regularly as gun dogs; they can also take part in `Conformation Shows` in F.C.I. member countries with two achieving French Champion status in 2014.

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